Traveller’s Tips

 

As a domestic or foreign tourist, your enjoyment and well-being are of utmost importance to us. As with any holiday trip here or overseas, there are a few basic precautions you should take during your visit to ensure that your stay is as pleasant and safe as possible.

  • Leave copies of Itinerary, ID or Passport data page, and Drivers Licence – Leave copies of your itinerary, ID or passport data page and drivers licence with family or friends, so you can be contacted in case of an emergency.
  • Leave copies of your Medical Prescriptions and for glasses – Leave copies of your medical prescriptions and prescription for glasses with family or friends so that it’s easily available in case of an emergency.
  • Take a small Medical / First Aid kit – Pack a little kit of plasters, headache tablets, a few syringes, and the usual stuff needed by your family.
  • Have Personal Accident Cover – When travelling in your own vehicle, ensure that you have Personal Accident Cover through your vehicle insurance company, or when renting a car it is advised that the Personal Accident Cover be added. You then have peace of mind that in case of accident, you and your family are covered.
  • Plan your route – Try to obtain a route map before you set out and plan your route beforehand.

Police 10111
Emergency Services 10177
Telephone Directory 1023

  • Well-lit ATM – Use a well-lit ATM when making an ATM transaction.
  • Be alert at the ATM – Be aware of your surroundings and do not allow anyone distract you or stand close to you while making a transaction.
  • Using your card to pay – Ask that the card machine be brought to you and never allow your card out of your sight.
  • Separate cash and cards – Separate your cash and credit cards and don’t carry all your cash with you.
  • Fines – It is strictly illegal to pay cash to a traffic officer or to any other official on the roadside.
    Legitimate fines should be paid at the police station or magistrate’s court only, where a receipt must be issued.
  • Toll fees are ONLY payable at toll gates. Under no circumstances may a tourist be coerced into paying toll fees at an ATM. This is a scam!


Individuals
How you can avoid being the victim of cash robberies

  • Carry as little cash as possible
  • Consider the convenience of paying your accounts electronically (consult your bank to find out about available options)
  • Consider making use of cellphone banking or internet transfers or ATMs to do your banking

Businesses
How you can avoid being a victim of cash robberies

  • Alternate the days and times on which you can deposit cash
  • Never make your bank visits public, even to people close to you
  • Do not openly display the money you are depositing while you are standing in the bank queue
  • Avoid carrying money bags, briefcases or openly displaying your receipt book
  • It’s advisable to identify another branch nearby that you can visit, to ensure that your banking pattern is not easily recognizable or detected
  • If the amount of cash you are regularly depositing is increasing as your business grows, consider using the services of a cash management company
  • Refrain from giving wages to your contract or casual labourers in full view of the public, rather make use of wage accounts that can be provided by your bank
  • Refrain from driving to the bank in your company branded vehicle on a typical ‘payday’
  • Consider arranging for electronic transfers of wages to your contract or casual labourers’ personal bank accounts

icon_legend_pdfHow to safeguard your cash

  • Sharp objects go in luggage – Sharp objects are not allowed in hand luggage and needs to be in your check-in luggage.
  • When checking in, valuables stay on you – Do not put valuables like cameras, jewellery, or laptops in your luggage. Also keep cabin luggage, which contains your valuables, with you at all times.
  • Put parcels in the boot of the car – Store parcels and other valuables out of sight in the boot of the car.
  • Lock doors – Always drive with your doors locked and your windows closed.
  • Fines – It is strictly illegal to pay cash to a traffic officer or to any other official on the roadside.
    Legitimate fines should be paid at the police station or magistrate’s court only, where a receipt must be issued.
  • Toll fees are ONLY payable at toll gates. Under no circumstances may a tourist be coerced into paying toll fees at an ATM. This is a scam!

  • Well-lit areas – Try to travel in groups and stick to well-lit streets, especially at night. Also park in well-lit areas.
  • Be aware of spiked drinks – Have your drink opened in front of you to ensure that it’s not spiked.
  • Avoid excess jewellery – Try to blend in, and wear/carry valuables out of sight.

Your ATM card is one of the quickest ways a thief can commit identity theft – and wipe out your bank account! It is particularly traumatic for tourists who may be far from home and family support. Here are some of the most common types of ATM scams:

1. Skimmer – This scam involves a device that is installed into/onto an ATM that can read your account information including your account number, PIN and balance. Usually these skimmers can hold up to 200 accounts worth of information at a time.

2. Shoulder Surfing – This low-tech scam involves observation techniques or some crafty social engineering tactics. Some thieves install a fake keypad on top of a real one to record account information and pin numbers. To capture more useable data to access someone’s account, they will also install a camera to record all other information – like your card number.

3. Cash Trapping – A crook installs something to block the cash from dispensing out of an ATM machine. A customer will then go inside the bank for help and will return to find the cash stolen by a thief.

4. “Lebanese Loop” – This type of financial identity theft is one of the simplest and becoming increasingly common. An identity thief installs a metal or plastic strip into the ATM card slot. The card goes in normally and the transaction to withdraw money moves along as it should. However, once it is complete and the card tries to eject, the loop prevents it from ejecting and the cash is not dispensed. As in the cash trapping scam, the customer walks into the bank to complain, while the thief removes the loop and has access to your bank account and cash.

5. Phishing – Phishing for your bank information occurs when a scammer sends an e-mail to a customer pretending to be a bank representative requesting you to update account information. The thief then uses this information to replicate an ATM card or withdraw money from a customer account via online banking.

What you can do: The best way to prevent ATM fraud is to monitor your bank accounts and only use ATMs that have security cameras. It is also important that you never leave your card in an ATM, even if it is only to inform the bank of a problem. Instead, you should call the bank and tell them you are at the ATM and there is a problem with your card. This will keep your account safe and identity protected until help comes to you. Never accept assistance from anyone who just happens to be around. Take instructions only from the bank.

Source: https://www.allclearid.com/blog/six-atm-scams-and-how-to-avoid-them

  • Always make use of a reliable and reputable transfer/shuttle service.
  • Also ensure the transfer/shuttle service provider is aware of the possibility that they might be followed on their way to the hotel. They should therefore be on the lookout for any suspicious vehicles and let you know if they suspect that they might be followed. If concerned they need to immediately phone through to the hotel staff who can then alert security and their Police sector vehicle or the Police station.
  • When you are expecting to have a high volume of guests, inform your Police Sector Manager so that the police vehicle can drive around more regularly in the area of your hotel and therefore increase police visibility.
  • If you have a high level delegation arriving it may be important to appoint additional security or alert the Police to increase visibility in the area.
  • Please make sure your security and front office personnel are fully briefed as to what to do in an emergency situation and have emergency contact numbers ready. Thus have the emergency numbers displayed clearly and visibly close to telephones and on office notice boards. These should include your Police Sector Vehicle, your Police Station’s telephone as well as your Private Security Provider. If you are using a transfer company all details should be on hand.
  • Ensure all staff are fully briefed on how best to manage guests and their requirements. They will be traumatised and require counselling if an incident has taken place. Often luggage, passports etc. have also been lost and this will need to be sorted out quickly. We suggest each hotel draws up its own customised protocol with all relevant procedures and numbers and this is made available to all staff.

(Courtesy – CathyFindlayPR)

If unsure of any area, approach the local police station or tourism office for further advice and guidance. Although incidents against tourists in South Africa are rare, it is advisable for you to be aware of basic emergency procedures in the unlikely event that you are a victim of crime. If you have been victimised, call the Police emergency number (10111) and briefly explain what happened.

If you are using a cell phone dial 112 for emergency services.

SABOA shares Silly Season Safety Tips while Travelling

 

 
In their latest member newsletter, The Southern African Bus Operators Association (SABOA) has shared with us some road safety tips to keep in mind while travelling long distances.
 
These include taking a 15 minute break at least every two hours; avoid eating heavy foods, as well as Stop and Resting if tired.
 
Read more here
 
 

Roadside Anti-Corruption Initiative

“Keeping tourists safe”

1. It is strictly illegal to pay cash to a traffic officer or to any other official on the roadside.
Legitimate fines should be paid at the police station or magistrate’s court only, where a receipt must be issued.

2. Toll fees are ONLY payable at toll gates. Under no circumstances may a tourist be coerced into paying toll fees at an ATM. This is a scam!

Should you have any problems or doubts please call the following number immediately:

SA Police – 10111
SA Tourism – www.tourismsafety.co.za